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Scout Ranks

Bobcat

No matter what age or grade a boy joins Cub Scouting, he must earn his Bobcat badge before he can advance to the rank of Tiger Cub, Wolf, Bear, or Webelos. The Bobcat badge teaches all new members some basics about being a Cub Scout or Webelos Scout. A boy must complete the Bobcat requirements, which include:

  1. Learn and say the Scout Oath, with help if needed.
  2. Learn and say the Scout Law, with help if needed.
  3. Show the Cub Scout sign. Tell what it means.
  4. Show the Cub Scout handshake. Tell what it means.
  5. Say the Cub Scout motto. Tell what it means.
  6. Give the Cub Scout salute. Tell what it means.
  7. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the booklet, How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse.


Tigers

A boy who is 7 years old or is in the first grade is a Tiger, and his adventures are found in the Tiger Handbook.

This is unique relative to other ranks in Cub Scouting. Tigers and their adult partners are just that, partners. They attend meetings together, go on adventures like field trips together, and complete requirements together.

Like all other new Cub Scouts, a Tiger must first earn his Bobcat rank. After completing the requirements for Bobcat he may go on to complete the requirements for the Tiger rank and the many electives that are offered for his rank.

Tiger Scouts work toward the Tiger rank. The Tiger rank is earned by completing seven adventures as described below.

Tiger Requirements

  1. Complete each of the following Tiger required adventures with your den or family:
    Backyard Jungle In this adventure, Tigers will learn that there are many types of living things that share the place where we live. All animals, plants, and insects have a purpose in our environment. It is everyone’s duty to be mindful of other creatures’ habitats. Regardless of their age, Tigers can make a difference.
    Games Tigers Play This adventure will help boys develop appropriate emotional responses, engage in shared decision making in group settings, and encourage an active and healthy lifestyle.
    My Family’s Duty to God This adventure will help Tigers understand what duty to God means in Scouting, and also what it means for them and their families.
    Team Tiger This adventure will introduce Tigers to the concept of teamwork and also to the idea that—even at a young age—they can make a difference in the world. Some of the activities in this adventure are home-based and involve the family and/or the adult partner, and others are to be performed with the den.
    Tiger Bites This adventure will introduce or reinforce healthy eating habits, including making the right food choices and practicing good hygiene. Activities will also focus on good manners at mealtime. In addition, the adventure will give each Tiger an opportunity to perform a useful service for his family.
    Tigers in the Wild Tigers will learn how to put the “outing” in Scouting with this outdoor adventure. They will start to develop an understanding of the Outdoor Ethics program as they are introduced to many skills that will be important throughout their Scouting careers.
  2. Complete one Tiger elective adventure of your den or family’s choosing:
  3. With your parent or adult partner, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse.
  4. Earn the Cyber Chip award for your age.*

*If your family does not have Internet access at home AND you do not have ready Internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of this requirement may be waived by your parent or adult partner.

For each adventure, the Tiger and adult partner team must complete the requirements as outlined in the Tiger Cub Scout Handbook. Requirement 7 of Bobcat and requirement 3 of Tiger are identical. If a Cub Scout earns his Bobcat
rank during the same year that he begins working on his Tiger rank, he needs to complete the requirement only one time.

A parent, guardian, or other caring adult acknowledges the completion of each achievement part by signing the boy’s handbook (Akela’s OK). The den leader also signs each boy’s handbook (Den Leader’s OK) and records progress in the den’s advancement records. The Wolf Scouts also keep track of their own advancement using the Adventure Tracking section in the back of their handbooks, and under the guidance of the den leader, they can also keep a record of their individual progress on a den advancement chart and den doodle.

The pack encourages each den to deliver a year-round program, drawing from both required adventures to support rank advancement and elective adventures to support program enrichment. Elective adventures may be earned during den activities, by a boy with the participation of his family, and during council and district sponsored program opportunities. There is no required order in which adventures must be earned. The sequence is left to the discretion of the den leader and Cubmaster.

After a boy earns the Tiger badge, he will continue to meet with his den, working on additional elective adventures until he completes first grade and becomes a Wolf Scout.


Wolves

A boy who is 8 years old or is in the second grade is a Wolf, and his adventures are found in the Wolf Handbook.

Like all other new Cub Scouts, a Wolf must first earn his Bobcat rank. After completing the requirements for Bobcat he may go on to complete the requirements for the Wolf rank and the many electives that are offered for his rank.

Wolf Scouts work toward the Wolf rank. The Wolf rank is earned by completing seven adventures as described below.

Wolf Requirements

  1. Complete each of the following Wolf required adventures with your den or family:
    Call of the Wild Many boys join Scouting because they want to go camping. This adventure will introduce Wolves to several camping skills—selecting and bringing gear, participating with their families in campfire shows, and being prepared for bad weather. They will also learn about animals they might see, the Leave No Trace Principles for Kids, tying knots, and how to handle potentially harmful situations.
    Council Fire This adventure will give Wolf Scouts the opportunity to learn more about their neighborhood and community structure, how they can be a part of their community through service, and how others have provided service to our country.
    Duty to God Footsteps This adventure will help each Wolf Scout develop a consistent awareness of his duty to God. He will also explore ways that he can practice his family’s beliefs as part of living out his duty to God.
    Howling at the Moon This adventure will give Cub Scouts an opportunity to become comfortable speaking in front of others. It will also serve as a foundation for organizing and performing a campfire program.
    Paws on the Path This adventure will encourage the development of hiking skills in Scouts.
    Running with the Pack This adventure will promote physical fitness and good health through games and other fun activities.
  2. Complete one Wolf elective adventure of your den or family’s choosing.
  3. With your parent or adult partner, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse.
  4. Earn the Cyber Chip award for your age.*

*If your family does not have Internet access at home AND you do not have ready Internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of this requirement may be waived by your parent or adult partner.

For each adventure, the Wolf Scout must complete the requirements as outlined in the Wolf Cub Scout Handbook. Requirement 7 of Bobcat and requirement 3 of Wolf are identical. If a Cub Scout earns his Bobcat rank during the same year that he begins working on his Wolf rank, he needs to complete the requirement only one time.

A parent, guardian, or other caring adult acknowledges the completion of each achievement part by signing the boy’s handbook (Akela’s OK). The den leader also signs each boy’s handbook (Den Leader’s OK) and records progress in the den’s advancement records. The Wolf Scouts also keep track of their own advancement using the Adventure Tracking section in the back of their handbooks, and under the guidance of the den leader, they can also keep a record of their individual progress on a den advancement chart and den doodle.

The pack encourages each den to deliver a year-round program, drawing from both required adventures to support rank advancement and elective adventures to support program enrichment. Elective adventures may be earned during den activities, by a boy with the participation of his family, and during council and district sponsored program opportunities. There is no required order in which adventures must be earned. The sequence is left to the discretion of the den leader and Cubmaster.

After a boy earns the Wolf badge, he will continue to meet with his den, working on additional elective adventures until he completes second grade and becomes a Bear Scout.


Bears

A boy who is 9 years old or is in the third grade is a Bear, and his adventures are found in the Bear Handbook.

Like all other new Cub Scouts, a Bear must first earn his Bobcat rank. After completing the requirements for Bobcat he may go on to complete the requirements for the Bear rank and the many electives that are offered for his rank.

Bear Scouts work toward the Bear rank. The Bear rank is earned by completing seven adventures as described below.

Bear Requirements

  1. Complete each of the following Bear required adventures with your den or family:
    Bear Claws Most young men are very excited about the opportunity to own and carry a pocketknife. In many families this may be a rite of passage. It is important that the Scout understands a pocketknife is a tool and not a toy, and how to responsibly handle and use the pocketknife when he is around others.
    Bear Necessities This adventure will introduce new Scouts to basic outdoor skills while helping more experienced Scouts improve and develop skills they learned in previous ranks.
    Fellowship and Duty of God To practice their duty to God, Bear Scouts will have opportunities in this adventure to be good neighbors, reaching out in fellowship to people in their communities. They will experience the universal principle, common to many religions, that we should treat others the way we want to be treated.
    Fur Feathers and Ferns In this adventure, Bears will explore the outdoor world of mammals, birds, plants, and more! They will understand that every living thing has a home—often very close by. Scouts will also discover that almost every living thing’s neighborhood is a home to at least one type of another living thing. Protecting those homes, called habitats, is up to everyone, and Bears can help!
    Grin and Bear It In this adventure, Cub Scouts will learn the value of helping other people have fun. The goal is to make sure all boys and leaders are wearing a grin!
    Paws for Action Scouts of this age are learning to become more independent. In this adventure, Bears will learn how to take care of themselves and be a help to their family, community, and the environment. Additionally, they will continue to learn about patriotism and loyalty to our country.
  2. Complete one Bear elective adventure of your den or family’s choosing.
  3. With your parent or adult partner, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse.
  4. Earn the Cyber Chip award for your age.*

*If your family does not have Internet access at home AND you do not have ready Internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of this requirement may be waived by your parent or adult partner.

For each adventure, the Bear Scout must complete the requirements as outlined in the Bear Cub Scout Handbook. Requirement 7 of Bobcat and requirement 3 of Bear are identical. If a Cub Scout earns his Bobcat rank during the same year that he begins working on his Bear rank, he needs to complete the requirement only one time.

A parent, guardian, or other caring adult acknowledges the completion of each achievement part by signing the boy’s handbook (Akela’s OK). The den leader also signs each boy’s handbook (Den Leader’s OK) and records progress in the den’s advancement records. The Bear Scouts also keep track of their own advancement using the Adventure Tracking section in the back of their handbooks, and under the guidance of the den leader, they can also keep a record of their individual progress on a den advancement chart and den doodle.

The pack encourages each den to deliver a year-round program, drawing from both required adventures to support rank advancement and elective adventures to support program enrichment. Elective adventures may be earned during den activities, by a boy with the participation of his family, and during council and district sponsored program opportunities. There is no required order in which adventures must be earned. The sequence is left to the discretion of the den leader and Cubmaster.

After a boy earns the Bear badge, he will continue to meet with his den, working on additional elective adventures until he completes third grade (or turns 10 years old) and becomes a Webelos Scout.


Webelos

A boy who is 10 years old or is in the fourth grade is a Webelos Scout, and his adventures are found in the Webelos Handbook.

Like all other new Cub Scouts, a Webelos must first earn his Bobcat rank. After completing the requirements for Bobcat he may go on to complete the requirements for the Wolf rank and the many electives that are offered for his rank.

Webelo Scouts work toward the Webelo rank. The Webelo rank is earned by completing seven adventures as described below.

Webelo Requirements

  1. Be an active member of your Webelos den for three months. (Being active means having good attendance, paying your den dues, and working on den projects)
  2. Complete each of the following Webelo required adventures with your den or family:
    Cast Iron Chef In this adventure, Webelos Scouts will learn about good nutrition, how to safely cook meals in the outdoors, and how to balance meal planning and finances.
    Duty to God and You A Scout is reverent. He is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties and respects the convictions of others in matters of custom and religion. The BSA Statement of Religious Principle “maintains that no member can grow into the best kind of citizen without recognizing an obligation to God.” This adventure provides each Webelos Scout an opportunity to learn about and practice his religious faith.
    First Responder This adventure will provide Webelos Scouts with an introduction to the skills and responsibilities of a first responder. Activities will cover essential personal safety and first-aid skills.
    Stronger, Faster, Higher This adventure promotes physical fitness and good health.
    Webelos Walkabout This adventure prepares Webelos Scouts for an outdoor experience and hiking activity.
  3. Complete one Webelo elective adventure of your den or family’s choosing:
  4. With your parent or adult partner, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse.
  5. Earn the Cyber Chip award for your age.*

*If your family does not have Internet access at home AND you do not have ready Internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of this requirement may be waived by your parent or adult partner.

For each adventure, the Webelo Scout must complete the requirements as outlined in the Webelo Cub Scout Handbook. Requirement 7 of Bobcat and requirement 4 of Webelo are identical. If a Cub Scout earns his Bobcat rank during the same year that he begins working on his Webelo rank, he needs to complete the requirement only one time.

A parent, guardian, or other caring adult acknowledges the completion of each achievement part by signing the boy’s handbook (Akela’s OK). The den leader also signs each boy’s handbook (Den Leader’s OK) and records progress in the den’s advancement records. The Webelo Scouts also keep track of their own advancement using the Adventure Tracking section in the back of their handbooks, and under the guidance of the den leader, they can also keep a record of their individual progress on a den advancement chart and den doodle.

The pack encourages each den to deliver a year-round program, drawing from both required adventures to support rank advancement and elective adventures to support program enrichment. Elective adventures may be earned during den activities, by a boy with the participation of his family, and during council and district sponsored program opportunities. There is no required order in which adventures must be earned. The sequence is left to the discretion of the den leader and Cubmaster.


Arrow of Light

A boy who is in the fourth or fifth grade is a Webelos Scout, and his adventures are found in the Webelos Handbook. Once a boy has completed his Webelos rank requirements or a new boy joins Cub Scouting in the fifth grade, he may work on Arrow of Light requirements.

Like all other new Cub Scouts, an Arrow of Light Scout must first earn his Bobcat rank. After completing the requirements for Bobcat he may go on to complete the requirements for the Arrow of Light rank and the many electives that are offered for his rank.

All Cub Scouts, except for those boys who join Cub Scouting for the first time in fifth grade, must earn their Webelos rank prior to earning Arrow of Light. The requirements for Webelos and Arrow of Light may be worked on at the same time but the tenure requirements for each must be met and the awards must be earned and presented sequentially.

Arrow of Light Scouts work toward the Webelo rank. The Arrow of Light rank is earned by completing seven adventures as described below.

Arrow of Light Requirements

  1. Be an active member of your Webelos den for three months. (Being active means having good attendance, paying your den dues, and working on den projects)
  2. Complete each of the following Webelo required adventures with your den or family:
    Building a Better World The wide range of activities in this adventure will help Webelos Scouts become strong, participating citizens in their communities, their nation, and the world at large.
    Camper In this Arrow of Light adventure, Scouts will go on campouts where they can gain and develop new outdoor skills.
    Duty to God in Action A Scout is reverent. He is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties and respects the convictions of others in matters of custom and religion.
    Scouting Adventure This Arrow of Light adventure will provide Scouts with an introduction to Boy Scouting, Scout skills, and Scout spirit. Webelos Scouts will attend a troop meeting and accompany a troop on a campout or an outdoor activity.
  3. Complete three of the Webelo elective adventure of your den or family’s choosing. These are listed in the Webelos section.
  4. With your parent or adult partner, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse.
  5. Earn the Cyber Chip award for your age.*

*If your family does not have Internet access at home AND you do not have ready Internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of this requirement may be waived by your parent or adult partner.

For each adventure, the Webelo Scout must complete the requirements as outlined in the Webelo Cub Scout Handbook. Requirement 7 of Bobcat and requirement 4 of Webelo are identical. If a Cub Scout earns his Bobcat rank during the same year that he begins working on his Webelo rank, he needs to complete the requirement only one time.

A parent, guardian, or other caring adult acknowledges the completion of each achievement part by signing the boy’s handbook (Akela’s OK). The den leader also signs each boy’s handbook (Den Leader’s OK) and records progress in the den’s advancement records. The Webelo Scouts also keep track of their own advancement using the Adventure Tracking section in the back of their handbooks, and under the guidance of the den leader, they can also keep a record of their individual progress on a den advancement chart and den doodle.

The pack encourages each den to deliver a year-round program, drawing from both required adventures to support rank advancement and elective adventures to support program enrichment. Elective adventures may be earned during den activities, by a boy with the participation of his family, and during council and district sponsored program opportunities. There is no required order in which adventures must be earned. The sequence is left to the discretion of the den leader and Cubmaster.

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